Archived Events

  • EBRC Virtual Seminar Series 2021

    Please join us for an exciting seminar series highlighting research advancing the field. Seminars are open to all, so please feel free to share this information with your colleagues.

    Seminars will be held on Zoom using the following link for all sessions:
    Zoom link: https://berkeley.zoom.us/j/97626552307?pwd=alVlS3dXM0lZYklYeE9zVXljWUI0UT09
    Meeting ID: 976 2655 2307
    Passcode: EBRC2021


    EBRC SEMINAR SERIES – MAY 4, 2021 (3:00 PM ET)

    Click here for more information, including abstracts (when available).

    Engineering multilevel CRISPR-based kill-switches for probiotic Escherichia coli
    Austin Rottinghaus (Washington University in St. Louis)

    Substrate-Activated Expression of a Biosynthetic Pathway in Escherichia coli
    Cynthia Ni (MIT)

    Robust direct digital-to-biological data storage in living cells
    Sung Sun Yim (Columbia University)

     

    EBRC SEMINAR SERIES – MAY 13, 2021 (2:00 PM ET)

    Click here for more information, including abstracts (when available).

    TBD
    Aindrila Mukhopadhyay (Lawrence Berkeley National Lab)

    “Non-canonical crRNAs derived from host transcripts enable multiplexable RNA detection by Cas9”
    Chunlei Jiao (Helmholtz Institute for RNA-based Infection Research)

    “Developing a mathematical framework for controlling complex biological systems”
    Marcella Gomez (UC Santa Cruz)

    “The Promoter Calculator – A Sequence-to-Function Biophysical Model of Transcriptional Initiation for Sigma70 Promoters with Any Sequence”
    Travis La Fleur (Penn State)

     

    EBRC SEMINAR SERIES – MAY 21, 2021 (4:00 PM ET)

    Click here for more information, including abstracts (when available).

    Sequence-function analysis helps identify multiple pathways to enhance Phenylalanine Ammonia-Lyase (PAL) activity
    Nikhil Unni Nair (Tufts University)

    Development of a yeast-based assay for bioavailable phosphorous
    Heather Shepherd (University of Notre Dame)

    Engineering alternative degradation tags for synthetic circuits
    Prajakta Jadhav (South Dakota State University)

  • [VIRTUAL] EBRC 2021 Annual Meeting

    The EBRC Annual Meeting is an opportunity for the EBRC community to come together to engage on matters important to advancing our field, present and discuss your latest research, and continue to build relationships with your colleagues throughout academia, industry, and government. This virtual meeting will feature sessions on research, EBRC’s work in our focus areas, and a panel discussion on diversity, equity, and inclusion.

    The meeting will be held virtually over three days: April 23 and 26-27, 2021. VIEW THE FULL AGENDA HERE.

    • Friday, Apr 23 (3:00-6:00pm ET) will kick off with a presentation and discussion of EBRC’s new Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Action Plan, followed by a poster session/social mixer in EBRC’s Gather Town.
    • Monday, Apr 26 (11:00am-2:00pm ET) will include updates on EBRC’s efforts across the focus areas and membership, followed by oral presentations and posters or a keynote address.
    • Tuesday, Apr 27 (11:00am-2:00pm ET) will continue the oral presentations and end where we started, with a panel on Diversity, Equity & Inclusion.
    • Following the meeting, EBRC will host a short seminar series to further spotlight research advancing the field. Seminars will be held at 3:00 pm ET May 4; 2:00 pm ET May 13; and 4:00 pm ET May 21.

    Registration is now open to all EBRC members and affiliates (including EBRC Student & Postdoc Association members). The deadline to register is April 21.

    Zoom and Gather Town will be used to hold this virtual event.

     

  • Malice Analysis at Rice University

    Biology is easier than ever to engineer. This reality requires researchers to take proactive steps to consider the security implications of their work. The Engineering Biology Research Consortium (EBRC) is holding an interactive workshop to help you identify potentially malicious applications of your work, mitigation options, and what to do if you identify something and don’t know how to proceed. The workshop is targeted to graduate students and postdocs, but we welcome others in engineering biology to attend. This technically-focused workshop will include plenary presentations and discussion and small group analysis of participants’ research. Participants that complete all aspects of the workshop will receive a certificate of completion which can be noted on your CV.

    Wednesday, April 28, 2021

    10:00AM – 1:30PM Pacific Time, 1:00 – 4:30 Eastern Time

    Register Here

    Malice Analysis: Rice University is being hosted by Rice faculty to better build and support a local security community in the Houston area. However, all are welcome to register. Contact Helix@ebrc.org, if you’re interested in hosting a virtual Malice Analysis workshop for your institution.

    This workshop is supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security under Grant Award Number, 2017‐ST‐108‐FRG002.

  • Malice Analysis at University of California, Berkeley

    Biology is easier than ever to engineer. This reality requires researchers to take proactive steps to consider the security implications of their work. The Engineering Biology Research Consortium (EBRC) is holding an interactive workshop to help you identify potentially malicious applications of your work, mitigation options, and what to do if you identify something and don’t know how to proceed. The workshop is targeted to graduate students and postdocs, but we welcome others in engineering biology to attend. This technically-focused workshop will include plenary presentations and discussion and small group analysis of participants’ research. Participants that complete all aspects of the workshop will receive a certificate of completion which can be noted on your CV.

    Thursday April 29, 2021

    9:00AM – 12:30PM Pacific Time, 12:00 – 3:30PM Eastern Time

    Register Here

    Malice Analysis: UC Berkeley is being hosted by UC Berkeley faculty to better build and support a local security community in the San Francisco Bay Area. However, all are welcome to register. Contact Helix@ebrc.org, if you’re interested in hosting a virtual Malice Analysis workshop for your institution.

    This workshop is supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security under Grant Award Number, 2017‐ST‐108‐FRG002.

  • Malice Analysis at Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Biology is easier than ever to engineer. This reality requires researchers to take proactive steps to consider the security implications of their work. The Engineering Biology Research Consortium (EBRC) is holding an interactive workshop to help you identify potentially malicious applications of your work, mitigation options, and what to do if you identify something and don’t know how to proceed. The workshop is targeted to graduate students and postdocs, but we welcome others in engineering biology to attend. This technically-focused workshop will include plenary presentations and discussion and small group analysis of participants’ research. Participants that complete all aspects of the workshop will receive a certificate of completion which can be noted on your CV.

    Wednesday May 5, 2021

    10:00AM – 1:30PM Pacific Time, 1:00 – 4:30PM Eastern Time

    Register Here

    Malice Analysis: MIT is being hosted by MIT faculty to better build and support a local security community in the Boston area. However, all are welcome to register. Contact Helix@ebrc.org, if you’re interested in hosting a virtual Malice Analysis workshop for your institution.

    This workshop is supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security under Grant Award Number, 2017‐ST‐108‐FRG002.

  • EBRC SPA Government and Science Policy Virtual Career Panel and Networking Session

    EBRC SPA Government and Science Policy Virtual Career Panel and Networking Session

    Date: Thursday, October 15, 2020
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm EDT/ 10:00am – 11:am PDT

    Register Here

    The EBRC Student and Postdoc Association (SPA) is hosting a virtual Government and Science Policy career panel and networking session to provide graduate students and postdocs with insights into government and policy careers, with an emphasis on how to enter this space from a science PhD background. This event will consist of a 30 min moderated Q&A panel followed by an optional 30 min networking session. Participants will indicate whether they would like to attend the networking session portion of the event and rank their networking session panelist preference on the registration form. The networking session will be capped on a first-come, first-serve basis, with priority given to existing Student and Postdoc Association members. If you are interested in joining the EBRC SPA, please find the application form here.  If you elect to participate in the networking session, you will be notified in the days leading up to the event regarding which panelist’s networking session you will be attending (space permitting).

     

  • Virtual Workshops – Technical Roadmap For Materials Science + Engineering Biology

    EBRC – with support from the Division of Materials Research at NSF – invites you to contribute to a 20-year technical research roadmap for the convergence of materials science and engineering biology.

    The roadmap is currently in the final drafting stage and we need experts to help continue to define and describe an ambitious future for basic research and development at the intersection of materials science and synthetic/engineering biology. At a time like this, we believe that it is more important than ever for scientists to help guide policymakers and funding agencies in how to best support scientific research, and technical roadmaps are a highly-impactful way to do that.


    Registration is by invitation only, but anyone interested in attending should email eaurand@ebrc.org for more information.

    Friday, October 16 | 11:00am – 2:00pm Eastern / 8:00am – 11:00am Pacific (Registration deadline: October 9)

    Registration has closed – please contact eaurand@ebrc.org for more information

     

    Tuesday, October 20 | 2:00pm – 5:00pm Eastern / 11:00am – 2:00pm Pacific (Registration deadline: October 13)

    Registration has closed – please contact eaurand@ebrc.org for more information

     

    Monday, October 26 | 12:00pm – 3:00pm Eastern / 9:00am – 12:00pm Pacific (Registration deadline: October 19)

    Registration has closed – please contact eaurand@ebrc.org for more information

     

    These virtual writing workshops (3 hours each) are focused on drafting and revising the roadmap. Workshops are organized as follows:

    • Introduction of workshop participants and the current status of the roadmap;
    • Drafting and revising of the roadmap’s technical themes (with a focus on processing, properties, and performance of materials from engineering biology). This includes describing the current state-of-the-art science and engineering and envisioning aggressive milestones for technical achievements that will contribute to the next generation of bio-inspired, bio-enabled, and living materials; and,
    • Brainstorming ambitious and inspiring applications of these new materials and technologies and the technical achievements that will contribute to their realization.

    A detailed agenda, participant instructions, and Zoom videoconferencing links will be emailed to registrants prior to each workshop.

     

  • EBRC Fall 2020 Retreat

    EBRC’s council retreat is by invitation only.

    REGISTRATION

    Virtual Online Event

    REGISTER

    MEETING OVERVIEW

    You must register to attend the EBRC Fall 2020 Council Retreat.

    The agenda will be distributed and posted online here when ready. Please use the timeline below for planning purposes.
    Thursday, October 8, 2020:  8:00 AM – 2:00 PM PDT
    Friday, October 9, 2020:       8:00 AM – Noon PDT

  • Malice Analysis: September 2020 Virtual Workshops

    EBRC is hosting several Malice Analysis Workshops during the month of September to train researchers to critically evaluate the security implications of their research. Pick the workshop time and date that fits your schedule and join us!

  • EBRC Malice Analysis (Virtual) Workshop: September 23, 2020

    Register Here

    Biology is easier than ever to engineer. While almost all synthetic biologists will use the tools of engineering biology / synthetic biology to understand the world around us and make it a better place, we need to recognize that malicious actors can also use these tools to generate harmful organisms or products. This reality requires researchers to take proactive steps to consider the security implications of their work. The EBRC is holding an interactive virtual workshop to train graduate students and postdocs to assess their own work for potentially malicious utility. We’ll discuss what to do if you identify a potential security issue in your own research or that of your colleagues.

  • EBRC Malice Analysis (Virtual) Workshop: September 21, 2020

    Register Here

    Biology is easier than ever to engineer. While almost all synthetic biologists will use the tools of engineering biology / synthetic biology to understand the world around us and make it a better place, we need to recognize that malicious actors can also use these tools to generate harmful organisms or products. This reality requires researchers to take proactive steps to consider the security implications of their work. The EBRC is holding an interactive virtual workshop to train graduate students and postdocs to assess their own work for potentially malicious utility. We’ll discuss what to do if you identify a potential security issue in your own research or that of your colleagues.

  • EBRC Malice Analysis (Virtual) Workshop: September 18, 2020

    Register Here

    Biology is easier than ever to engineer. While almost all synthetic biologists will use the tools of engineering biology / synthetic biology to understand the world around us and make it a better place, we need to recognize that malicious actors can also use these tools to generate harmful organisms or products. This reality requires researchers to take proactive steps to consider the security implications of their work. The EBRC is holding an interactive virtual workshop to train graduate students and postdocs to assess their own work for potentially malicious utility. We’ll discuss what to do if you identify a potential security issue in your own research or that of your colleagues.

  • EBRC Malice Analysis (Virtual) Workshop: September 16, 2020

    Register Here

    Biology is easier than ever to engineer. While almost all synthetic biologists will use the tools of engineering biology / synthetic biology to understand the world around us and make it a better place, we need to recognize that malicious actors can also use these tools to generate harmful organisms or products. This reality requires researchers to take proactive steps to consider the security implications of their work. The EBRC is holding an interactive virtual workshop to train graduate students and postdocs to assess their own work for potentially malicious utility. We’ll discuss what to do if you identify a potential security issue in your own research or that of your colleagues.

  • EBRC Malice Analysis (Virtual) Workshop: September 9, 2020

    Register Here

    Biology is easier than ever to engineer. While almost all synthetic biologists will use the tools of engineering biology / synthetic biology to understand the world around us and make it a better place, we need to recognize that malicious actors can also use these tools to generate harmful organisms or products. This reality requires researchers to take proactive steps to consider the security implications of their work. The EBRC is holding an interactive virtual workshop to train graduate students and postdocs to assess their own work for potentially malicious utility. We’ll discuss what to do if you identify a potential security issue in your own research or that of your colleagues.

  • EBRC Malice Analysis Workshop

    Register Here

    Biology is easier than ever to engineer. While almost all synthetic biologists will use the tools of engineering biology / synthetic biology to understand the world around us and make it a better place, we need to recognize that malicious actors can also use these tools to generate harmful organisms or products. This reality requires researchers to take proactive steps to consider the security implications of their work. The EBRC is holding an interactive virtual workshop to train graduate students and postdocs to assess their own work for potentially malicious utility. We’ll discuss what to do if you identify a potential security issue in your own research or that of your colleagues.

  • Virtual Workshops – Technical Roadmap for Materials from Engineering Biology

    EBRC – with support from the Division of Materials Research at NSF – invites you to contribute to a technical roadmap for materials from engineering biology.

    The roadmap is currently in a drafting stage and we need experts to help continue to define and describe the 20+ year future for basic research and development at the intersection of materials science and synthetic/engineering biology. At a time like this, we believe that it is more important than ever for scientists to help guide policymakers and funding agencies in how to best support scientific research, and technical roadmaps are a highly-impactful way to do that.

    EBRC is facilitating a series of virtual mini-workshops (2.5 – 3 hours each) focused on specific biomaterials subtopics to construct the roadmap. Workshops are organized as follows:

    • Workshop participants will engage in discussion and drafting of roadmap content covering a variety of topics.
    • Roadmap content will include description of current state-of-the-art science and engineering, milestones for technical achievements, and overarching goals and capabilities that will contribute to the next generation of bio-inspired, bio-enabled, and living materials.
    • Participants can expect to review instructions for contributing and a summary of the current content prior to the workshop, and are encouraged to continue contributing and providing insight, feedback, and review as we work toward a final product.

    Details about each workshop, including dates/times, select topics to be covered, can be found below (registration deadline one week prior to workshop). Zoom videoconferencing links will be emailed to registrants. For more information, please contact roadmapping@ebrc.org


    Wednesday, June 17 | 8:00am – 10:30am Pacific (Registration by June 11)

    REGISTRATION HAS CLOSED; for more information, please contact roadmapping@ebrc.org

    Workshop topics will include:

      • Designing and producing materials dynamic materials capable of closed-loop feedback systems, including1Drachuk I, Harbaugh S, Geryak R, Kaplan DL, Tsukruk VV, Kelley-Loughnane N. Immobilization of Recombinant E. coli Cells in a Bacterial Cellulose–Silk Composite Matrix To Preserve Biological Function. ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering 2017 3 (10), 2278-2292. doi: 10.1021/acsbiomaterials.7b00367; Tay PKR, Nguyen PQ, Joshi NS. A Synthetic Circuit for Mercury Bioremediation Using Self-Assembling Functional Amyloids. ACS Synth Biol. 2017;6(10):1841‐1850. doi:10.1021/acssynbio.7b00137; Gilbert C, Ellis T. Biological Engineered Living Materials: Growing Functional Materials with Genetically Programmable Properties. ACS Synth Biol. 2019;8(1):1‐15. doi:10.1021/acssynbio.8b00423; Nielsen AA, Der BS, Shin J, et al. Genetic circuit design automation. Science. 2016;352(6281):aac7341. doi:10.1126/science.aac7341; Liu X, Tang TC, Tham E, et al. Stretchable living materials and devices with hydrogel-elastomer hybrids hosting programmed cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017;114(9):2200‐2205. doi:10.1073/pnas.1618307114; Weisenberger MS, Deans TL. Bottom-up approaches in synthetic biology and biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol. 2018;45(7):599‐614. doi:10.1007/s10295-018-2027-3
        :

        • Sensing, signal encoding, and storage,
        • Signal integration and management,
        • Communication and response,
        • Computation (e.g., logic functions)
      • Integrating and functionalizing the biology-material (biotic-abiotic) interface2Heyde KC, Ruder WC. Programming Biomaterial Interactions Using Engineered Living Cells. Methods Mol Biol. 2018;1772:249‐265. doi:10.1007/978-1-4939-7795-6_14; Chen AY, Zhong C, Lu TK. Engineering living functional materials. ACS Synth Biol. 2015;4(1):8‐11. doi:10.1021/sb500113b
      • Tools and technologies to develop robust and reproducible materials properties testing for (dynamic) biomaterials3Boudot C, Boccoz A, Düregger K, Kuhnla A. A novel blood incubation system for the in-vitro assessment of interactions between platelets and biomaterial surfaces under dynamic flow conditions: The Hemocoater. J Biomed Mater Res A. 2016;104(10):2430‐2440. doi:10.1002/jbm.a.35787; Quinci F, Dressler M, Strickland AM, Limbert G. Towards an accurate understanding of UHMWPE visco-dynamic behaviour for numerical modelling of implants. J Mech Behav Biomed Mater. 2014;32:62‐75. doi:10.1016/j.jmbbm.2013.12.023
      • Multi-scale modeling for biomaterial properties and dynamic activity4Gronau G, Krishnaji ST, Kinahan ME, et al. A review of combined experimental and computational procedures for assessing biopolymer structure-process-property relationships. Biomaterials. 2012;33(33):8240‐8255. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2012.06.054; Raffaini G, Ganazzoli F. Understanding the performance of biomaterials through molecular modeling: crossing the bridge between their intrinsic properties and the surface adsorption of proteins. Macromol Biosci. 2007;7(5):552‐566. doi:
        10.1002/mabi.200600278

    Types of participant-expertise we’re looking for (but not limited to): circuit/pathway engineering, cell biology, computational biology, molecular dynamics, materials science

    Past workshops:
    Thursday, May 28 | 8am – 11am Pacific (Registration by May 21)

    REGISTRATION HAS CLOSED; for more information, please contact roadmapping@ebrc.org

    Workshop topics will include:

      • Integrating and functionalizing the biology-material (biotic-abiotic) interface5Heyde KC, Ruder WC. Programming Biomaterial Interactions Using Engineered Living Cells. Methods Mol Biol. 2018;1772:249‐265. doi:10.1007/978-1-4939-7795-6_14; Chen AY, Zhong C, Lu TK. Engineering living functional materials. ACS Synth Biol. 2015;4(1):8‐11. doi:10.1021/sb500113b
      • Templating and patterning of biomaterials6Chen AY, Deng Z, Billings AN, et al. Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells. Nat Mater. 2014;13(5):515‐523. doi:10.1038/nmat3912; Lagziel-Simis S, Cohen-Hadar N, Moscovich-Dagan H, Wine Y, Freeman A. Protein-mediated nanoscale biotemplating. Curr Opin Biotechnol. 2006;17(6):569‐573. doi:10.1016/j.copbio.2006.10.005
      • Designing and producing materials dynamic materials capable of closed-loop feedback systems, including7Drachuk I, Harbaugh S, Geryak R, Kaplan DL, Tsukruk VV, Kelley-Loughnane N. Immobilization of Recombinant E. coli Cells in a Bacterial Cellulose–Silk Composite Matrix To Preserve Biological Function. ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering 2017 3 (10), 2278-2292. doi: 10.1021/acsbiomaterials.7b00367; Tay PKR, Nguyen PQ, Joshi NS. A Synthetic Circuit for Mercury Bioremediation Using Self-Assembling Functional Amyloids. ACS Synth Biol. 2017;6(10):1841‐1850. doi:10.1021/acssynbio.7b00137; Gilbert C, Ellis T. Biological Engineered Living Materials: Growing Functional Materials with Genetically Programmable Properties. ACS Synth Biol. 2019;8(1):1‐15. doi:10.1021/acssynbio.8b00423; Nielsen AA, Der BS, Shin J, et al. Genetic circuit design automation. Science. 2016;352(6281):aac7341. doi:10.1126/science.aac7341; Liu X, Tang TC, Tham E, et al. Stretchable living materials and devices with hydrogel-elastomer hybrids hosting programmed cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017;114(9):2200‐2205. doi:10.1073/pnas.1618307114; Weisenberger MS, Deans TL. Bottom-up approaches in synthetic biology and biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol. 2018;45(7):599‐614. doi:10.1007/s10295-018-2027-3
        :

        • Sensing, signal encoding, and storage,
        • Signal integration and management,
        • Communication and response,
        • Computation (e.g., logic functions)
      • Multi-scale modeling for biomaterial properties and dynamic activity8Gronau G, Krishnaji ST, Kinahan ME, et al. A review of combined experimental and computational procedures for assessing biopolymer structure-process-property relationships. Biomaterials. 2012;33(33):8240‐8255. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2012.06.054; Raffaini G, Ganazzoli F. Understanding the performance of biomaterials through molecular modeling: crossing the bridge between their intrinsic properties and the surface adsorption of proteins. Macromol Biosci. 2007;7(5):552‐566. doi:
        10.1002/mabi.200600278

    Types of participant-expertise we’re looking for (but not limited to): circuit/pathway engineering, biomolecular and cellular physiology, membrane engineering/dynamics, nanomaterials, polymers, metals and ceramics

    ——
    Friday, June 5 | 8am – 11am Pacific (Registration by May 29)

    REGISTRATION HAS CLOSED; for more information, please contact roadmapping@ebrc.org

    Workshop topics will include:

      • Biomolecular, metabolic, and chassis engineering for biomaterials9Basu A, Vadanan SV, Lim S. A Novel Platform for Evaluating the Environmental Impacts on Bacterial Cellulose Production. Sci Rep. 2018;8(1):5780. Published 2018 Apr 10. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-23701-y; Becker J, Rohles CM, Wittmann C. Metabolically engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum for bio-based production of chemicals, fuels, materials, and healthcare products. Metab Eng. 2018;50:122‐141. doi:10.1016/j.ymben.2018.07.008
      • Synthesis, polymerization, and degradation of bio-enabled and bio-composed materials10Hoshino Y, Kodama T, Okahata Y, Shea KJ. Peptide imprinted polymer nanoparticles: a plastic antibody. J Am Chem Soc. 2008;130(46):15242‐15243. doi:10.1021/ja8062875; Stabenfeldt SE, Gourley M, Krishnan L, Hoying JB, Barker TH. Engineering fibrin polymers through engagement of alternative polymerization mechanisms. Biomaterials. 2012;33(2):535‐544. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2011.09.079; Yildirimer L, Seifalian AM. Three-dimensional biomaterial degradation – Material choice, design and extrinsic factor considerations. Biotechnol Adv. 2014;32(5):984‐999. doi:10.1016/j.biotechadv.2014.04.014
      • Enabling secretion and extrusion of biomaterials (polymers, functionalized biomolecules, etc.)11Nadell CD, Xavier JB, Levin SA, Foster KR. The evolution of quorum sensing in bacterial biofilms. PLoS Biol. 2008;6(1):e14. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060014; Mitra SD, Afonina I, Kline KA. Right Place, Right Time: Focalization of Membrane Proteins in Gram-Positive Bacteria. Trends Microbiol. 2016;24(8):611‐621. doi:10.1016/j.tim.2016.03.009
      • Templating and patterning of biomaterials12Chen AY, Deng Z, Billings AN, et al. Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells. Nat Mater. 2014;13(5):515‐523. doi:10.1038/nmat3912; Lagziel-Simis S, Cohen-Hadar N, Moscovich-Dagan H, Wine Y, Freeman A. Protein-mediated nanoscale biotemplating. Curr Opin Biotechnol. 2006;17(6):569‐573. doi:10.1016/j.copbio.2006.10.005
      • Tools and technologies to enable scale-up and process manufacturing of biomaterials13Gdowski A, Johnson K, Shah S, Gryczynski I, Vishwanatha J, Ranjan A. Optimization and scale up of microfluidic nanolipomer production method for preclinical and potential clinical trials. J Nanobiotechnology. 2018;16(1):12. Published 2018 Feb 12. doi:10.1186/s12951-018-0339-0

    Types of participant-expertise we’re looking for (but not limited to): polymer engineering, bioprocess engineering, metabolic engineering, biomolecular dynamics, materials science

    ——
    CANCELLED Thursday, June 11 | 8:30am – 11am Pacific (Registration by June 4)

    REGISTRATION HAS CLOSED; for more information, please contact roadmapping@ebrc.org

    Workshop topics will include:

      • Tools and technologies to enable scale-up and process manufacturing of biomaterials14Gdowski A, Johnson K, Shah S, Gryczynski I, Vishwanatha J, Ranjan A. Optimization and scale up of microfluidic nanolipomer production method for preclinical and potential clinical trials. J Nanobiotechnology. 2018;16(1):12. Published 2018 Feb 12. doi:10.1186/s12951-018-0339-0
      • Multi-scale modeling for biomaterial properties and dynamic activity15Gronau G, Krishnaji ST, Kinahan ME, et al. A review of combined experimental and computational procedures for assessing biopolymer structure-process-property relationships. Biomaterials. 2012;33(33):8240‐8255. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2012.06.054; Raffaini G, Ganazzoli F. Understanding the performance of biomaterials through molecular modeling: crossing the bridge between their intrinsic properties and the surface adsorption of proteins. Macromol Biosci. 2007;7(5):552‐566. doi:
        10.1002/mabi.200600278
      • Tools and technologies to develop robust and reproducible materials properties testing for (dynamic) biomaterials16Boudot C, Boccoz A, Düregger K, Kuhnla A. A novel blood incubation system for the in-vitro assessment of interactions between platelets and biomaterial surfaces under dynamic flow conditions: The Hemocoater. J Biomed Mater Res A. 2016;104(10):2430‐2440. doi:10.1002/jbm.a.35787; Quinci F, Dressler M, Strickland AM, Limbert G. Towards an accurate understanding of UHMWPE visco-dynamic behaviour for numerical modelling of implants. J Mech Behav Biomed Mater. 2014;32:62‐75. doi:10.1016/j.jmbbm.2013.12.023

    Types of participant-expertise we’re looking for (but not limited to): computational biology, molecular dynamics, material dynamics, bioprocess engineering, materials science

    ——

     


    The following citations (indicated as footnotes above) are provided to suggest areas of science and engineering we will be considering for the roadmap topics covered in each workshop and how the topics might align with participants’ areas of expertise. These are representative works not intended to be inclusive or exclusive of what will be covered in the roadmap.

    1. Drachuk I, Harbaugh S, Geryak R, Kaplan DL, Tsukruk VV, Kelley-Loughnane N. Immobilization of Recombinant E. coli Cells in a Bacterial Cellulose–Silk Composite Matrix To Preserve Biological Function. ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering 2017 3 (10), 2278-2292. doi: 10.1021/acsbiomaterials.7b00367; Tay PKR, Nguyen PQ, Joshi NS. A Synthetic Circuit for Mercury Bioremediation Using Self-Assembling Functional Amyloids. ACS Synth Biol. 2017;6(10):1841‐1850. doi:10.1021/acssynbio.7b00137; Gilbert C, Ellis T. Biological Engineered Living Materials: Growing Functional Materials with Genetically Programmable Properties. ACS Synth Biol. 2019;8(1):1‐15. doi:10.1021/acssynbio.8b00423; Nielsen AA, Der BS, Shin J, et al. Genetic circuit design automation. Science. 2016;352(6281):aac7341. doi:10.1126/science.aac7341; Liu X, Tang TC, Tham E, et al. Stretchable living materials and devices with hydrogel-elastomer hybrids hosting programmed cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017;114(9):2200‐2205. doi:10.1073/pnas.1618307114; Weisenberger MS, Deans TL. Bottom-up approaches in synthetic biology and biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol. 2018;45(7):599‐614. doi:10.1007/s10295-018-2027-3

    2. Heyde KC, Ruder WC. Programming Biomaterial Interactions Using Engineered Living Cells. Methods Mol Biol. 2018;1772:249‐265. doi:10.1007/978-1-4939-7795-6_14; Chen AY, Zhong C, Lu TK. Engineering living functional materials. ACS Synth Biol. 2015;4(1):8‐11. doi:10.1021/sb500113b

    3. Boudot C, Boccoz A, Düregger K, Kuhnla A. A novel blood incubation system for the in-vitro assessment of interactions between platelets and biomaterial surfaces under dynamic flow conditions: The Hemocoater. J Biomed Mater Res A. 2016;104(10):2430‐2440. doi:10.1002/jbm.a.35787; Quinci F, Dressler M, Strickland AM, Limbert G. Towards an accurate understanding of UHMWPE visco-dynamic behaviour for numerical modelling of implants. J Mech Behav Biomed Mater. 2014;32:62‐75. doi:10.1016/j.jmbbm.2013.12.023

    4. Gronau G, Krishnaji ST, Kinahan ME, et al. A review of combined experimental and computational procedures for assessing biopolymer structure-process-property relationships. Biomaterials. 2012;33(33):8240‐8255. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2012.06.054; Raffaini G, Ganazzoli F. Understanding the performance of biomaterials through molecular modeling: crossing the bridge between their intrinsic properties and the surface adsorption of proteins. Macromol Biosci. 2007;7(5):552‐566. doi:
    10.1002/mabi.200600278

    5. Heyde KC, Ruder WC. Programming Biomaterial Interactions Using Engineered Living Cells. Methods Mol Biol. 2018;1772:249‐265. doi:10.1007/978-1-4939-7795-6_14; Chen AY, Zhong C, Lu TK. Engineering living functional materials. ACS Synth Biol. 2015;4(1):8‐11. doi:10.1021/sb500113b

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    7. Drachuk I, Harbaugh S, Geryak R, Kaplan DL, Tsukruk VV, Kelley-Loughnane N. Immobilization of Recombinant E. coli Cells in a Bacterial Cellulose–Silk Composite Matrix To Preserve Biological Function. ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering 2017 3 (10), 2278-2292. doi: 10.1021/acsbiomaterials.7b00367; Tay PKR, Nguyen PQ, Joshi NS. A Synthetic Circuit for Mercury Bioremediation Using Self-Assembling Functional Amyloids. ACS Synth Biol. 2017;6(10):1841‐1850. doi:10.1021/acssynbio.7b00137; Gilbert C, Ellis T. Biological Engineered Living Materials: Growing Functional Materials with Genetically Programmable Properties. ACS Synth Biol. 2019;8(1):1‐15. doi:10.1021/acssynbio.8b00423; Nielsen AA, Der BS, Shin J, et al. Genetic circuit design automation. Science. 2016;352(6281):aac7341. doi:10.1126/science.aac7341; Liu X, Tang TC, Tham E, et al. Stretchable living materials and devices with hydrogel-elastomer hybrids hosting programmed cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017;114(9):2200‐2205. doi:10.1073/pnas.1618307114; Weisenberger MS, Deans TL. Bottom-up approaches in synthetic biology and biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol. 2018;45(7):599‐614. doi:10.1007/s10295-018-2027-3

    8. Gronau G, Krishnaji ST, Kinahan ME, et al. A review of combined experimental and computational procedures for assessing biopolymer structure-process-property relationships. Biomaterials. 2012;33(33):8240‐8255. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2012.06.054; Raffaini G, Ganazzoli F. Understanding the performance of biomaterials through molecular modeling: crossing the bridge between their intrinsic properties and the surface adsorption of proteins. Macromol Biosci. 2007;7(5):552‐566. doi:
    10.1002/mabi.200600278

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    12. Chen AY, Deng Z, Billings AN, et al. Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells. Nat Mater. 2014;13(5):515‐523. doi:10.1038/nmat3912; Lagziel-Simis S, Cohen-Hadar N, Moscovich-Dagan H, Wine Y, Freeman A. Protein-mediated nanoscale biotemplating. Curr Opin Biotechnol. 2006;17(6):569‐573. doi:10.1016/j.copbio.2006.10.005

    13. Gdowski A, Johnson K, Shah S, Gryczynski I, Vishwanatha J, Ranjan A. Optimization and scale up of microfluidic nanolipomer production method for preclinical and potential clinical trials. J Nanobiotechnology. 2018;16(1):12. Published 2018 Feb 12. doi:10.1186/s12951-018-0339-0

    14. Gdowski A, Johnson K, Shah S, Gryczynski I, Vishwanatha J, Ranjan A. Optimization and scale up of microfluidic nanolipomer production method for preclinical and potential clinical trials. J Nanobiotechnology. 2018;16(1):12. Published 2018 Feb 12. doi:10.1186/s12951-018-0339-0

    15. Gronau G, Krishnaji ST, Kinahan ME, et al. A review of combined experimental and computational procedures for assessing biopolymer structure-process-property relationships. Biomaterials. 2012;33(33):8240‐8255. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2012.06.054; Raffaini G, Ganazzoli F. Understanding the performance of biomaterials through molecular modeling: crossing the bridge between their intrinsic properties and the surface adsorption of proteins. Macromol Biosci. 2007;7(5):552‐566. doi:
    10.1002/mabi.200600278

    16. Boudot C, Boccoz A, Düregger K, Kuhnla A. A novel blood incubation system for the in-vitro assessment of interactions between platelets and biomaterial surfaces under dynamic flow conditions: The Hemocoater. J Biomed Mater Res A. 2016;104(10):2430‐2440. doi:10.1002/jbm.a.35787; Quinci F, Dressler M, Strickland AM, Limbert G. Towards an accurate understanding of UHMWPE visco-dynamic behaviour for numerical modelling of implants. J Mech Behav Biomed Mater. 2014;32:62‐75. doi:10.1016/j.jmbbm.2013.12.023

  • [Virtual Meeting] EBRC Annual Meeting Poster Session

    EBRC Annual Meeting Poster Hall & Live Poster Session
    Virtual Meeting

    In lieu of a poster session at the Annual Meeting, we are organizing a virtual “poster hall” that will be available from March 31 through April 3. On March 31, links to view posters will be provided to those registered for our virtual annual meeting.

    On Thursday April 2 from 1:30pm – 3:00pm PST, we will host a Live Poster Session. Poster presenters will be divided into Zoom meeting rooms. Poster viewers will receive a list of poster presenters and associated Zoom links and may enter Zoom rooms to ask questions and hear more about the work of the presenter.

    Agenda

  • [Virtual Meeting] EBRC Roadmapping Working Group

    Register Here

    EBRC Roadmapping Working Group
    Virtual Meeting
    Friday, April 3, 2020
    11:00am – 1:00pm PST

    We will discuss the dissemination and impact of the 2019 Roadmap (published June 2019), and review and discuss the progress, current status, and upcoming efforts of the 2020 Roadmaps: Materials from Engineering Biology and Microbiomes Engineering. Please join us to learn more about these roadmaps and how EBRC members can contribute.

    Agenda

    Participation instructions will be sent to you via email prior to the meeting date.

  • [Virtual Meeting] EBRC SPA SBIR Workshop

    Register Here

    EBRC SPA SBIR Workshop
    Virtual Meeting
    Friday, April 3, 2020
    9:00am – 11:00pm PST

    How to Apply for a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program Grant
    Are you a graduate student or postdoc interested in entrepreneurship or looking to commercialize your research? Join the SPA for a panel on the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, a federal program that provides funding for startups and small businesses to engage in innovative research and development with commercialization potential. Our panel features Dr. Erik Pierstorff (SBIR/STTR Program Director at the National Science Foundation), Dr. Rachel Jordan (Research Scientist at Lynntech, Inc.), and Dr. Michael Heffernan (Principal at Fannin Innovation Studio).

    Agenda

    Participation instructions will be sent to you via email prior to the meeting date.

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