Events

  • EBRC Malice Analysis (Virtual) Workshop: September 9, 2020

    Register Here

    Biology is easier than ever to engineer. While almost all synthetic biologists will use the tools of engineering biology / synthetic biology to understand the world around us and make it a better place, we need to recognize that malicious actors can also use these tools to generate harmful organisms or products. This reality requires researchers to take proactive steps to consider the security implications of their work. The EBRC is holding an interactive virtual workshop to train graduate students and postdocs to assess their own work for potentially malicious utility. We’ll discuss what to do if you identify a potential security issue in your own research or that of your colleagues.

  • EBRC Malice Analysis Workshop

    Register Here

    Biology is easier than ever to engineer. While almost all synthetic biologists will use the tools of engineering biology / synthetic biology to understand the world around us and make it a better place, we need to recognize that malicious actors can also use these tools to generate harmful organisms or products. This reality requires researchers to take proactive steps to consider the security implications of their work. The EBRC is holding an interactive virtual workshop to train graduate students and postdocs to assess their own work for potentially malicious utility. We’ll discuss what to do if you identify a potential security issue in your own research or that of your colleagues.

  • Virtual Workshops – Technical Roadmap for Materials from Engineering Biology

    EBRC – with support from the Division of Materials Research at NSF – invites you to contribute to a technical roadmap for materials from engineering biology.

    The roadmap is currently in a drafting stage and we need experts to help continue to define and describe the 20+ year future for basic research and development at the intersection of materials science and synthetic/engineering biology. At a time like this, we believe that it is more important than ever for scientists to help guide policymakers and funding agencies in how to best support scientific research, and technical roadmaps are a highly-impactful way to do that.

    EBRC is facilitating a series of virtual mini-workshops (2.5 – 3 hours each) focused on specific biomaterials subtopics to construct the roadmap. Workshops are organized as follows:

    • Workshop participants will engage in discussion and drafting of roadmap content covering a variety of topics.
    • Roadmap content will include description of current state-of-the-art science and engineering, milestones for technical achievements, and overarching goals and capabilities that will contribute to the next generation of bio-inspired, bio-enabled, and living materials.
    • Participants can expect to review instructions for contributing and a summary of the current content prior to the workshop, and are encouraged to continue contributing and providing insight, feedback, and review as we work toward a final product.

    Details about each workshop, including dates/times, select topics to be covered, can be found below (registration deadline one week prior to workshop). Zoom videoconferencing links will be emailed to registrants. For more information, please contact roadmapping@ebrc.org


    Wednesday, June 17 | 8:00am – 10:30am Pacific (Registration by June 11)

    REGISTRATION HAS CLOSED; for more information, please contact roadmapping@ebrc.org

    Workshop topics will include:

      • Designing and producing materials dynamic materials capable of closed-loop feedback systems, including1Drachuk I, Harbaugh S, Geryak R, Kaplan DL, Tsukruk VV, Kelley-Loughnane N. Immobilization of Recombinant E. coli Cells in a Bacterial Cellulose–Silk Composite Matrix To Preserve Biological Function. ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering 2017 3 (10), 2278-2292. doi: 10.1021/acsbiomaterials.7b00367; Tay PKR, Nguyen PQ, Joshi NS. A Synthetic Circuit for Mercury Bioremediation Using Self-Assembling Functional Amyloids. ACS Synth Biol. 2017;6(10):1841‐1850. doi:10.1021/acssynbio.7b00137; Gilbert C, Ellis T. Biological Engineered Living Materials: Growing Functional Materials with Genetically Programmable Properties. ACS Synth Biol. 2019;8(1):1‐15. doi:10.1021/acssynbio.8b00423; Nielsen AA, Der BS, Shin J, et al. Genetic circuit design automation. Science. 2016;352(6281):aac7341. doi:10.1126/science.aac7341; Liu X, Tang TC, Tham E, et al. Stretchable living materials and devices with hydrogel-elastomer hybrids hosting programmed cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017;114(9):2200‐2205. doi:10.1073/pnas.1618307114; Weisenberger MS, Deans TL. Bottom-up approaches in synthetic biology and biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol. 2018;45(7):599‐614. doi:10.1007/s10295-018-2027-3
        :

        • Sensing, signal encoding, and storage,
        • Signal integration and management,
        • Communication and response,
        • Computation (e.g., logic functions)
      • Integrating and functionalizing the biology-material (biotic-abiotic) interface2Heyde KC, Ruder WC. Programming Biomaterial Interactions Using Engineered Living Cells. Methods Mol Biol. 2018;1772:249‐265. doi:10.1007/978-1-4939-7795-6_14; Chen AY, Zhong C, Lu TK. Engineering living functional materials. ACS Synth Biol. 2015;4(1):8‐11. doi:10.1021/sb500113b
      • Tools and technologies to develop robust and reproducible materials properties testing for (dynamic) biomaterials3Boudot C, Boccoz A, Düregger K, Kuhnla A. A novel blood incubation system for the in-vitro assessment of interactions between platelets and biomaterial surfaces under dynamic flow conditions: The Hemocoater. J Biomed Mater Res A. 2016;104(10):2430‐2440. doi:10.1002/jbm.a.35787; Quinci F, Dressler M, Strickland AM, Limbert G. Towards an accurate understanding of UHMWPE visco-dynamic behaviour for numerical modelling of implants. J Mech Behav Biomed Mater. 2014;32:62‐75. doi:10.1016/j.jmbbm.2013.12.023
      • Multi-scale modeling for biomaterial properties and dynamic activity4Gronau G, Krishnaji ST, Kinahan ME, et al. A review of combined experimental and computational procedures for assessing biopolymer structure-process-property relationships. Biomaterials. 2012;33(33):8240‐8255. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2012.06.054; Raffaini G, Ganazzoli F. Understanding the performance of biomaterials through molecular modeling: crossing the bridge between their intrinsic properties and the surface adsorption of proteins. Macromol Biosci. 2007;7(5):552‐566. doi:
        10.1002/mabi.200600278

    Types of participant-expertise we’re looking for (but not limited to): circuit/pathway engineering, cell biology, computational biology, molecular dynamics, materials science

    Past workshops:
    Thursday, May 28 | 8am – 11am Pacific (Registration by May 21)

    REGISTRATION HAS CLOSED; for more information, please contact roadmapping@ebrc.org

    Workshop topics will include:

      • Integrating and functionalizing the biology-material (biotic-abiotic) interface5Heyde KC, Ruder WC. Programming Biomaterial Interactions Using Engineered Living Cells. Methods Mol Biol. 2018;1772:249‐265. doi:10.1007/978-1-4939-7795-6_14; Chen AY, Zhong C, Lu TK. Engineering living functional materials. ACS Synth Biol. 2015;4(1):8‐11. doi:10.1021/sb500113b
      • Templating and patterning of biomaterials6Chen AY, Deng Z, Billings AN, et al. Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells. Nat Mater. 2014;13(5):515‐523. doi:10.1038/nmat3912; Lagziel-Simis S, Cohen-Hadar N, Moscovich-Dagan H, Wine Y, Freeman A. Protein-mediated nanoscale biotemplating. Curr Opin Biotechnol. 2006;17(6):569‐573. doi:10.1016/j.copbio.2006.10.005
      • Designing and producing materials dynamic materials capable of closed-loop feedback systems, including7Drachuk I, Harbaugh S, Geryak R, Kaplan DL, Tsukruk VV, Kelley-Loughnane N. Immobilization of Recombinant E. coli Cells in a Bacterial Cellulose–Silk Composite Matrix To Preserve Biological Function. ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering 2017 3 (10), 2278-2292. doi: 10.1021/acsbiomaterials.7b00367; Tay PKR, Nguyen PQ, Joshi NS. A Synthetic Circuit for Mercury Bioremediation Using Self-Assembling Functional Amyloids. ACS Synth Biol. 2017;6(10):1841‐1850. doi:10.1021/acssynbio.7b00137; Gilbert C, Ellis T. Biological Engineered Living Materials: Growing Functional Materials with Genetically Programmable Properties. ACS Synth Biol. 2019;8(1):1‐15. doi:10.1021/acssynbio.8b00423; Nielsen AA, Der BS, Shin J, et al. Genetic circuit design automation. Science. 2016;352(6281):aac7341. doi:10.1126/science.aac7341; Liu X, Tang TC, Tham E, et al. Stretchable living materials and devices with hydrogel-elastomer hybrids hosting programmed cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017;114(9):2200‐2205. doi:10.1073/pnas.1618307114; Weisenberger MS, Deans TL. Bottom-up approaches in synthetic biology and biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol. 2018;45(7):599‐614. doi:10.1007/s10295-018-2027-3
        :

        • Sensing, signal encoding, and storage,
        • Signal integration and management,
        • Communication and response,
        • Computation (e.g., logic functions)
      • Multi-scale modeling for biomaterial properties and dynamic activity8Gronau G, Krishnaji ST, Kinahan ME, et al. A review of combined experimental and computational procedures for assessing biopolymer structure-process-property relationships. Biomaterials. 2012;33(33):8240‐8255. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2012.06.054; Raffaini G, Ganazzoli F. Understanding the performance of biomaterials through molecular modeling: crossing the bridge between their intrinsic properties and the surface adsorption of proteins. Macromol Biosci. 2007;7(5):552‐566. doi:
        10.1002/mabi.200600278

    Types of participant-expertise we’re looking for (but not limited to): circuit/pathway engineering, biomolecular and cellular physiology, membrane engineering/dynamics, nanomaterials, polymers, metals and ceramics

    ——
    Friday, June 5 | 8am – 11am Pacific (Registration by May 29)

    REGISTRATION HAS CLOSED; for more information, please contact roadmapping@ebrc.org

    Workshop topics will include:

      • Biomolecular, metabolic, and chassis engineering for biomaterials9Basu A, Vadanan SV, Lim S. A Novel Platform for Evaluating the Environmental Impacts on Bacterial Cellulose Production. Sci Rep. 2018;8(1):5780. Published 2018 Apr 10. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-23701-y; Becker J, Rohles CM, Wittmann C. Metabolically engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum for bio-based production of chemicals, fuels, materials, and healthcare products. Metab Eng. 2018;50:122‐141. doi:10.1016/j.ymben.2018.07.008
      • Synthesis, polymerization, and degradation of bio-enabled and bio-composed materials10Hoshino Y, Kodama T, Okahata Y, Shea KJ. Peptide imprinted polymer nanoparticles: a plastic antibody. J Am Chem Soc. 2008;130(46):15242‐15243. doi:10.1021/ja8062875; Stabenfeldt SE, Gourley M, Krishnan L, Hoying JB, Barker TH. Engineering fibrin polymers through engagement of alternative polymerization mechanisms. Biomaterials. 2012;33(2):535‐544. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2011.09.079; Yildirimer L, Seifalian AM. Three-dimensional biomaterial degradation – Material choice, design and extrinsic factor considerations. Biotechnol Adv. 2014;32(5):984‐999. doi:10.1016/j.biotechadv.2014.04.014
      • Enabling secretion and extrusion of biomaterials (polymers, functionalized biomolecules, etc.)11Nadell CD, Xavier JB, Levin SA, Foster KR. The evolution of quorum sensing in bacterial biofilms. PLoS Biol. 2008;6(1):e14. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060014; Mitra SD, Afonina I, Kline KA. Right Place, Right Time: Focalization of Membrane Proteins in Gram-Positive Bacteria. Trends Microbiol. 2016;24(8):611‐621. doi:10.1016/j.tim.2016.03.009
      • Templating and patterning of biomaterials12Chen AY, Deng Z, Billings AN, et al. Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells. Nat Mater. 2014;13(5):515‐523. doi:10.1038/nmat3912; Lagziel-Simis S, Cohen-Hadar N, Moscovich-Dagan H, Wine Y, Freeman A. Protein-mediated nanoscale biotemplating. Curr Opin Biotechnol. 2006;17(6):569‐573. doi:10.1016/j.copbio.2006.10.005
      • Tools and technologies to enable scale-up and process manufacturing of biomaterials13Gdowski A, Johnson K, Shah S, Gryczynski I, Vishwanatha J, Ranjan A. Optimization and scale up of microfluidic nanolipomer production method for preclinical and potential clinical trials. J Nanobiotechnology. 2018;16(1):12. Published 2018 Feb 12. doi:10.1186/s12951-018-0339-0

    Types of participant-expertise we’re looking for (but not limited to): polymer engineering, bioprocess engineering, metabolic engineering, biomolecular dynamics, materials science

    ——
    CANCELLED Thursday, June 11 | 8:30am – 11am Pacific (Registration by June 4)

    REGISTRATION HAS CLOSED; for more information, please contact roadmapping@ebrc.org

    Workshop topics will include:

      • Tools and technologies to enable scale-up and process manufacturing of biomaterials14Gdowski A, Johnson K, Shah S, Gryczynski I, Vishwanatha J, Ranjan A. Optimization and scale up of microfluidic nanolipomer production method for preclinical and potential clinical trials. J Nanobiotechnology. 2018;16(1):12. Published 2018 Feb 12. doi:10.1186/s12951-018-0339-0
      • Multi-scale modeling for biomaterial properties and dynamic activity15Gronau G, Krishnaji ST, Kinahan ME, et al. A review of combined experimental and computational procedures for assessing biopolymer structure-process-property relationships. Biomaterials. 2012;33(33):8240‐8255. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2012.06.054; Raffaini G, Ganazzoli F. Understanding the performance of biomaterials through molecular modeling: crossing the bridge between their intrinsic properties and the surface adsorption of proteins. Macromol Biosci. 2007;7(5):552‐566. doi:
        10.1002/mabi.200600278
      • Tools and technologies to develop robust and reproducible materials properties testing for (dynamic) biomaterials16Boudot C, Boccoz A, Düregger K, Kuhnla A. A novel blood incubation system for the in-vitro assessment of interactions between platelets and biomaterial surfaces under dynamic flow conditions: The Hemocoater. J Biomed Mater Res A. 2016;104(10):2430‐2440. doi:10.1002/jbm.a.35787; Quinci F, Dressler M, Strickland AM, Limbert G. Towards an accurate understanding of UHMWPE visco-dynamic behaviour for numerical modelling of implants. J Mech Behav Biomed Mater. 2014;32:62‐75. doi:10.1016/j.jmbbm.2013.12.023

    Types of participant-expertise we’re looking for (but not limited to): computational biology, molecular dynamics, material dynamics, bioprocess engineering, materials science

    ——

     


    The following citations (indicated as footnotes above) are provided to suggest areas of science and engineering we will be considering for the roadmap topics covered in each workshop and how the topics might align with participants’ areas of expertise. These are representative works not intended to be inclusive or exclusive of what will be covered in the roadmap.

    1. Drachuk I, Harbaugh S, Geryak R, Kaplan DL, Tsukruk VV, Kelley-Loughnane N. Immobilization of Recombinant E. coli Cells in a Bacterial Cellulose–Silk Composite Matrix To Preserve Biological Function. ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering 2017 3 (10), 2278-2292. doi: 10.1021/acsbiomaterials.7b00367; Tay PKR, Nguyen PQ, Joshi NS. A Synthetic Circuit for Mercury Bioremediation Using Self-Assembling Functional Amyloids. ACS Synth Biol. 2017;6(10):1841‐1850. doi:10.1021/acssynbio.7b00137; Gilbert C, Ellis T. Biological Engineered Living Materials: Growing Functional Materials with Genetically Programmable Properties. ACS Synth Biol. 2019;8(1):1‐15. doi:10.1021/acssynbio.8b00423; Nielsen AA, Der BS, Shin J, et al. Genetic circuit design automation. Science. 2016;352(6281):aac7341. doi:10.1126/science.aac7341; Liu X, Tang TC, Tham E, et al. Stretchable living materials and devices with hydrogel-elastomer hybrids hosting programmed cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017;114(9):2200‐2205. doi:10.1073/pnas.1618307114; Weisenberger MS, Deans TL. Bottom-up approaches in synthetic biology and biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol. 2018;45(7):599‐614. doi:10.1007/s10295-018-2027-3

    2. Heyde KC, Ruder WC. Programming Biomaterial Interactions Using Engineered Living Cells. Methods Mol Biol. 2018;1772:249‐265. doi:10.1007/978-1-4939-7795-6_14; Chen AY, Zhong C, Lu TK. Engineering living functional materials. ACS Synth Biol. 2015;4(1):8‐11. doi:10.1021/sb500113b

    3. Boudot C, Boccoz A, Düregger K, Kuhnla A. A novel blood incubation system for the in-vitro assessment of interactions between platelets and biomaterial surfaces under dynamic flow conditions: The Hemocoater. J Biomed Mater Res A. 2016;104(10):2430‐2440. doi:10.1002/jbm.a.35787; Quinci F, Dressler M, Strickland AM, Limbert G. Towards an accurate understanding of UHMWPE visco-dynamic behaviour for numerical modelling of implants. J Mech Behav Biomed Mater. 2014;32:62‐75. doi:10.1016/j.jmbbm.2013.12.023

    4. Gronau G, Krishnaji ST, Kinahan ME, et al. A review of combined experimental and computational procedures for assessing biopolymer structure-process-property relationships. Biomaterials. 2012;33(33):8240‐8255. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2012.06.054; Raffaini G, Ganazzoli F. Understanding the performance of biomaterials through molecular modeling: crossing the bridge between their intrinsic properties and the surface adsorption of proteins. Macromol Biosci. 2007;7(5):552‐566. doi:
    10.1002/mabi.200600278

    5. Heyde KC, Ruder WC. Programming Biomaterial Interactions Using Engineered Living Cells. Methods Mol Biol. 2018;1772:249‐265. doi:10.1007/978-1-4939-7795-6_14; Chen AY, Zhong C, Lu TK. Engineering living functional materials. ACS Synth Biol. 2015;4(1):8‐11. doi:10.1021/sb500113b

    6. Chen AY, Deng Z, Billings AN, et al. Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells. Nat Mater. 2014;13(5):515‐523. doi:10.1038/nmat3912; Lagziel-Simis S, Cohen-Hadar N, Moscovich-Dagan H, Wine Y, Freeman A. Protein-mediated nanoscale biotemplating. Curr Opin Biotechnol. 2006;17(6):569‐573. doi:10.1016/j.copbio.2006.10.005

    7. Drachuk I, Harbaugh S, Geryak R, Kaplan DL, Tsukruk VV, Kelley-Loughnane N. Immobilization of Recombinant E. coli Cells in a Bacterial Cellulose–Silk Composite Matrix To Preserve Biological Function. ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering 2017 3 (10), 2278-2292. doi: 10.1021/acsbiomaterials.7b00367; Tay PKR, Nguyen PQ, Joshi NS. A Synthetic Circuit for Mercury Bioremediation Using Self-Assembling Functional Amyloids. ACS Synth Biol. 2017;6(10):1841‐1850. doi:10.1021/acssynbio.7b00137; Gilbert C, Ellis T. Biological Engineered Living Materials: Growing Functional Materials with Genetically Programmable Properties. ACS Synth Biol. 2019;8(1):1‐15. doi:10.1021/acssynbio.8b00423; Nielsen AA, Der BS, Shin J, et al. Genetic circuit design automation. Science. 2016;352(6281):aac7341. doi:10.1126/science.aac7341; Liu X, Tang TC, Tham E, et al. Stretchable living materials and devices with hydrogel-elastomer hybrids hosting programmed cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017;114(9):2200‐2205. doi:10.1073/pnas.1618307114; Weisenberger MS, Deans TL. Bottom-up approaches in synthetic biology and biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol. 2018;45(7):599‐614. doi:10.1007/s10295-018-2027-3

    8. Gronau G, Krishnaji ST, Kinahan ME, et al. A review of combined experimental and computational procedures for assessing biopolymer structure-process-property relationships. Biomaterials. 2012;33(33):8240‐8255. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2012.06.054; Raffaini G, Ganazzoli F. Understanding the performance of biomaterials through molecular modeling: crossing the bridge between their intrinsic properties and the surface adsorption of proteins. Macromol Biosci. 2007;7(5):552‐566. doi:
    10.1002/mabi.200600278

    9. Basu A, Vadanan SV, Lim S. A Novel Platform for Evaluating the Environmental Impacts on Bacterial Cellulose Production. Sci Rep. 2018;8(1):5780. Published 2018 Apr 10. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-23701-y; Becker J, Rohles CM, Wittmann C. Metabolically engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum for bio-based production of chemicals, fuels, materials, and healthcare products. Metab Eng. 2018;50:122‐141. doi:10.1016/j.ymben.2018.07.008

    10. Hoshino Y, Kodama T, Okahata Y, Shea KJ. Peptide imprinted polymer nanoparticles: a plastic antibody. J Am Chem Soc. 2008;130(46):15242‐15243. doi:10.1021/ja8062875; Stabenfeldt SE, Gourley M, Krishnan L, Hoying JB, Barker TH. Engineering fibrin polymers through engagement of alternative polymerization mechanisms. Biomaterials. 2012;33(2):535‐544. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2011.09.079; Yildirimer L, Seifalian AM. Three-dimensional biomaterial degradation – Material choice, design and extrinsic factor considerations. Biotechnol Adv. 2014;32(5):984‐999. doi:10.1016/j.biotechadv.2014.04.014

    11. Nadell CD, Xavier JB, Levin SA, Foster KR. The evolution of quorum sensing in bacterial biofilms. PLoS Biol. 2008;6(1):e14. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060014; Mitra SD, Afonina I, Kline KA. Right Place, Right Time: Focalization of Membrane Proteins in Gram-Positive Bacteria. Trends Microbiol. 2016;24(8):611‐621. doi:10.1016/j.tim.2016.03.009

    12. Chen AY, Deng Z, Billings AN, et al. Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells. Nat Mater. 2014;13(5):515‐523. doi:10.1038/nmat3912; Lagziel-Simis S, Cohen-Hadar N, Moscovich-Dagan H, Wine Y, Freeman A. Protein-mediated nanoscale biotemplating. Curr Opin Biotechnol. 2006;17(6):569‐573. doi:10.1016/j.copbio.2006.10.005

    13. Gdowski A, Johnson K, Shah S, Gryczynski I, Vishwanatha J, Ranjan A. Optimization and scale up of microfluidic nanolipomer production method for preclinical and potential clinical trials. J Nanobiotechnology. 2018;16(1):12. Published 2018 Feb 12. doi:10.1186/s12951-018-0339-0

    14. Gdowski A, Johnson K, Shah S, Gryczynski I, Vishwanatha J, Ranjan A. Optimization and scale up of microfluidic nanolipomer production method for preclinical and potential clinical trials. J Nanobiotechnology. 2018;16(1):12. Published 2018 Feb 12. doi:10.1186/s12951-018-0339-0

    15. Gronau G, Krishnaji ST, Kinahan ME, et al. A review of combined experimental and computational procedures for assessing biopolymer structure-process-property relationships. Biomaterials. 2012;33(33):8240‐8255. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2012.06.054; Raffaini G, Ganazzoli F. Understanding the performance of biomaterials through molecular modeling: crossing the bridge between their intrinsic properties and the surface adsorption of proteins. Macromol Biosci. 2007;7(5):552‐566. doi:
    10.1002/mabi.200600278

    16. Boudot C, Boccoz A, Düregger K, Kuhnla A. A novel blood incubation system for the in-vitro assessment of interactions between platelets and biomaterial surfaces under dynamic flow conditions: The Hemocoater. J Biomed Mater Res A. 2016;104(10):2430‐2440. doi:10.1002/jbm.a.35787; Quinci F, Dressler M, Strickland AM, Limbert G. Towards an accurate understanding of UHMWPE visco-dynamic behaviour for numerical modelling of implants. J Mech Behav Biomed Mater. 2014;32:62‐75. doi:10.1016/j.jmbbm.2013.12.023

  • [Virtual Meeting] EBRC Annual Meeting Poster Session

    EBRC Annual Meeting Poster Hall & Live Poster Session
    Virtual Meeting

    In lieu of a poster session at the Annual Meeting, we are organizing a virtual “poster hall” that will be available from March 31 through April 3. On March 31, links to view posters will be provided to those registered for our virtual annual meeting.

    On Thursday April 2 from 1:30pm – 3:00pm PST, we will host a Live Poster Session. Poster presenters will be divided into Zoom meeting rooms. Poster viewers will receive a list of poster presenters and associated Zoom links and may enter Zoom rooms to ask questions and hear more about the work of the presenter.

    Agenda

  • [Virtual Meeting] EBRC Roadmapping Working Group

    Register Here

    EBRC Roadmapping Working Group
    Virtual Meeting
    Friday, April 3, 2020
    11:00am – 1:00pm PST

    We will discuss the dissemination and impact of the 2019 Roadmap (published June 2019), and review and discuss the progress, current status, and upcoming efforts of the 2020 Roadmaps: Materials from Engineering Biology and Microbiomes Engineering. Please join us to learn more about these roadmaps and how EBRC members can contribute.

    Agenda

    Participation instructions will be sent to you via email prior to the meeting date.

  • [Virtual Meeting] EBRC SPA SBIR Workshop

    Register Here

    EBRC SPA SBIR Workshop
    Virtual Meeting
    Friday, April 3, 2020
    9:00am – 11:00pm PST

    How to Apply for a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program Grant
    Are you a graduate student or postdoc interested in entrepreneurship or looking to commercialize your research? Join the SPA for a panel on the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, a federal program that provides funding for startups and small businesses to engage in innovative research and development with commercialization potential. Our panel features Dr. Erik Pierstorff (SBIR/STTR Program Director at the National Science Foundation), Dr. Rachel Jordan (Research Scientist at Lynntech, Inc.), and Dr. Michael Heffernan (Principal at Fannin Innovation Studio).

    Agenda

    Participation instructions will be sent to you via email prior to the meeting date.

  • [Virtual Meeting] EBRC Policy & International Engagement Working Group

    Register Here

    EBRC Policy & International Engagement Working Group
    Virtual Meeting
    Friday, April 3, 2020
    9:00am – 11:00am PST

    The policy & international engagement working group will provide a recap of recent actions and events, including the 2019 Global Forum for Engineering Biology, and discuss efforts to engage the community around relevant policy and international issues. The discussion will focus on developing actions for the working group to focus on for the rest of the EBRC year. We are actively recruiting new and interested EBRC members and welcome anyone interested in this topical area.

    Agenda

    Participation instructions will be sent to you via email prior to the meeting date.

  • [Virtual Meeting] EBRC Education Working Group

    Register Here

    EBRC Education Working Group
    Virtual Meeting
    Thursday, April 2, 2020
    11:00am – 1:00pm PST

    We will discuss recent and on-going efforts in EBRC Education and Outreach, including the EBRC YouTube channel, current development of agile curriculum modules for engineering biology higher education, and future programs for engineering biology education in the K-12 landscape. Participants can expect to review and/or contribute to the curriculum modules and other plans.

    Agenda

    Participation instructions will be sent to you via email prior to the meeting date.

  • [Virtual Meeting] EBRC Security Working Group

    Register Here

    EBRC Security Working Group
    Virtual Meeting
    Thursday, April 2, 2020
    9:00am – 11:00pm PST

    The Security Working Group Chairman will provide a short presentation on the background and purpose of the Group. Dr. Mackelprang will talk about her project and provide some questions about the security ontology project. The majority of the time will be spent on discussions on the Malice Analysis program. This will include updates on the roadshow in light of the COVID-19 outbreak, as well as discussions on how to adapt the program for industry and funders of research.

    Agenda

    Participation instructions will be sent to you via email prior to the meeting date.

  • BioInd Manufacturing Innovation Institute EBRC Team Meeting

    Thank you for your interest in the EBRC’s Bioindustrial MII Team. Some of the links below may no longer be active as we progress in the proposal process. If you’re interested in joining or discussing our team, please contact bioindmii@ebrc.org.


    The EBRC is hosting a second Bioindustrial MII Team Meeting on March 6, 2020 in Arlington, VA.  This meeting is scheduled the day following the Government Proposers’ Day and in the same location. Advance registration is required.

    Register here

    This meeting will include:

    1. A presentation and discussion of proposed institute framework developed based on your input.
    2. Breakout Sessions for each of the working group topic areas. The initial work product of each working group will serve as the basis for the breakout discussions, with a goal of further refining the details of an institutional model. Please see our recent email(s) about joining our working groups and teams to develop the institute. More detail can be found in our updated Q&A document.
    3. Plenary discussion of all topics.

    This meeting is open to relevant biomanufacturing stakeholders and is subject to capacity limits. Organizations not US-owned and operated inside the United States should contact BioIndMII@ebrc.org prior to registering. Advance registration is required.

    Read our Updated Q&A

    IMPORTANT DATES

    WORKSHOP VENUE & HOST HOTEL INFORMATION:

    Marriott Crystal Gateway
    1700 Richmond Highway, Arlington, VA | 703-920-3230

    Negotiated room rate: $269/night plus taxes/fees at LINK or by calling 1-800-228-9290 and requesting the “EBRC Meeting” rate.

    Point of Contact

    You may contact the EBRC Team at BioIndMII@ebrc.org

  • Malice Analysis, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Register Here

    Biology is easier than ever to engineer. This reality requires researchers to take proactive steps to consider the security implications of their work. The Engineering Biology Research Consortium (EBRC) is holding an interactive workshop to help you identify potentially malicious applications of your work, mitigation options, and what to do if you identify something and don’t know how to proceed. This four-hour, technically-focused workshop will include plenary presentations and discussion and small group analysis of participant projects. Refreshments will be served culminating with lunch as part of the final debrief. Participants that complete all aspects of the workshop will receive a certificate of completion which can be noted on your CV.

    This workshop is supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security under Grant Award Number, 2017‐ST‐108‐FRG002.

  • [CANCELLED] Malice Analysis, Georgia Institute of Technology

    The Engineering Biology Research Consortium’s Malice Analysis workshop at Georgia Tech on April 10 is cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    We appreciate your interest. Feel free to reach out to EBRC at helix@ebrc.org if you would like more information on security in engineering biology.

    Biology is easier than ever to engineer. This reality requires researchers to take proactive steps to consider the security implications of their work. The Engineering Biology Research Consortium (EBRC) is holding an interactive workshop to help you identify potentially malicious applications of your work, mitigation options, and what to do if you identify something and don’t know how to proceed. This four-hour, technically-focused workshop will include plenary presentations and discussion and small group analysis of participant projects. Refreshments will be served culminating with lunch as part of the final debrief. Participants that complete all aspects of the workshop will receive a certificate of completion which can be noted on your CV.

    This workshop is supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security under Grant Award Number, 2017‐ST‐108‐FRG002.

  • [CANCELLED] Malice Analysis, Clemson University

    The Engineering Biology Research Consortium’s Malice Analysis workshop at Clemson University on April 9 is cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    We appreciate your interest. Feel free to reach out to EBRC at helix@ebrc.org if you would like more information on security in engineering biology.

    Biology is easier than ever to engineer. This reality requires researchers to take proactive steps to consider the security implications of their work. The Engineering Biology Research Consortium (EBRC) is holding an interactive workshop to help you identify potentially malicious applications of your work, mitigation options, and what to do if you identify something and don’t know how to proceed. This four-hour, technically-focused workshop will include plenary presentations and discussion and small group analysis of participant projects. Refreshments will be served culminating with lunch as part of the final debrief. Participants that complete all aspects of the workshop will receive a certificate of completion which can be noted on your CV.

    This workshop is supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security under Grant Award Number, 2017‐ST‐108‐FRG002.

  • Malice Analysis, University of Michigan

    Register Here

    Biology is easier than ever to engineer. This reality requires researchers to take proactive steps to consider the security implications of their work. The Engineering Biology Research Consortium (EBRC) is holding an interactive workshop to help you identify potentially malicious applications of your work, mitigation options, and what to do if you identify something and don’t know how to proceed. This four-hour, technically-focused workshop will include plenary presentations and discussion and small group analysis of participant projects. Refreshments will be served culminating with lunch as part of the final debrief. Participants that complete all aspects of the workshop will receive a certificate of completion which can be noted on your CV.

    This workshop is supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security under Grant Award Number, 2017‐ST‐108‐FRG002.

  • [CANCELLED] Malice Analysis, North Carolina State University

    The Engineering Biology Research Consortium’s Malice Analysis workshop at NCSU on April 8 is cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    We appreciate your interest. Feel free to reach out to EBRC at helix@ebrc.org if you would like more information on security in engineering biology.

    Biology is easier than ever to engineer. This reality requires researchers to take proactive steps to consider the security implications of their work. The Engineering Biology Research Consortium (EBRC) is holding an interactive workshop to help you identify potentially malicious applications of your work, mitigation options, and what to do if you identify something and don’t know how to proceed. This four-hour, technically-focused workshop will include plenary presentations and discussion and small group analysis of participant projects. Refreshments will be served culminating with lunch as part of the final debrief. Participants that complete all aspects of the workshop will receive a certificate of completion which can be noted on your CV.

    This workshop is supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security under Grant Award Number, 2017‐ST‐108‐FRG002.

  • [CANCELLED] Malice Analysis, Rice University

    The Engineering Biology Research Consortium’s Malice Analysis workshop at Rice University on April 1, 2020 has been cancelled to the COVID-19 pandemic.

    We appreciate your interest. Feel free to reach out to EBRC at helix@ebrc.org if you would like more information on security in engineering biology.

    Biology is easier than ever to engineer. This reality requires researchers to take proactive steps to consider the security implications of their work. The Engineering Biology Research Consortium (EBRC) is holding an interactive workshop to help you identify potentially malicious applications of your work, mitigation options, and what to do if you identify something and don’t know how to proceed. This four-hour, technically-focused workshop will include plenary presentations and discussion and small group analysis of participant projects. Refreshments will be served culminating with lunch as part of the final debrief. Participants that complete all aspects of the workshop will receive a certificate of completion which can be noted on your CV.

    This workshop is supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security under Grant Award Number, 2017‐ST‐108‐FRG002.

  • [VIRTUAL] Writing Workshop: An EBRC Roadmap for Microbiome Engineering

    Participation in this workshop is by invitation only.

    Registration for this workshop is now closed. Please contact roadmap@ebrc.org for more information.


    As a follow-up to EBRC’s 2019 roadmap Engineering Biology, we are developing a technical research roadmap for microbiome engineering, to be published in Summer 2020. Microbiomes have the capacity to substantially influence their environment in novel ways, and therefore engineering and applying these technologies has broad implications for industry, agriculture, medicine, and other biotechnology sectors. Our primary technical themes focus on spatial and temporal microbiome engineering, stably engineering ecological diversity, and engineering cooperative biosynthesis of compounds to facilitate novel biochemistry.

    This (now virtual) writing workshop will be a critical opportunity to elaborate on and refine the technical content of the roadmap, and discuss the application and impacts of engineered microbiomes. Workshop activities are expected to include:

    • Plenary discussion of existing technical themes, goals, and breakthrough capabilities;
    • Breakout groups to detail technical milestones, and accompanying Bottlenecks and Potential Solutions;
    • Breakout groups to draft and revise application sector content, with a particular focus on Health & Medicine, Energy, and Industrial Biotechnology; and
    • Plenary and breakout group review of material.

    Agenda

  • [VIRTUAL] Writing Workshop: An EBRC Roadmap for Materials Engineering

    Participation in this virtual workshop is by invitation only. Please contact roadmap@ebrc.org for more information.


    As a follow-up to EBRC’s 2019 roadmap Engineering Biology, we are developing a technical research roadmap for materials from engineering biology, to be published in Summer 2020, focusing on technologies related to:

    • The structure and functionality of biological and inorganic materials,
    • Production of novel and defined biopolymers,
    • Engineering cells and consortia to produce challenging natural materials and compounds, and
    • Tools and technologies for the production of living materials that incorporate  cells to sustain active and responsive behaviors.

    The roadmap will also address applying these technologies, with broad implications for industry, agriculture, medicine, and other biotechnology sectors.

    This writing workshop will be a critical opportunity to create the goals, objectives, and milestones of a roadmap for materials from engineering biology, and to articulate the impact of engineering biology applied to novel materials. Workshop activities are expected to include:

    • Plenary discussions addressing scope, high-level goals and challenges, and appropriateness of milestones;
    • Breakout groups to draft and revise content specific to technical themes and/or application spaces; and
    • Plenary and breakout group review of material.

    Agenda

  • Writing Workshop: An EBRC Roadmap for Microbiomes Engineering

    Participation in this workshop is by invitation only. Please contact roadmap@ebrc.org for more information.

    Draft Agenda Workshop Documents Folder


    Microbiomes have the capacity to substantially influence their environment in novel ways, and therefore engineering and applying these technologies has broad implications for industry, agriculture, medicine, and other biotechnology sectors.

    This writing workshop will be a critical opportunity to refine the scope, topics, and themes of a roadmap for microbiome engineering, and to create the technical content of the roadmap. Workshop activities are expected to include:

    • Plenary discussions addressing scope, high-level goals and challenges, and appropriateness of milestones;
    • Breakout groups to draft and revise content specific to technical themes and/or application spaces; and
    • Plenary and breakout group review of material.

  • Back to top ⇑